Amphibole class asbestos types have straight, needle-like fibers that differ from the curlier fibers of the serpentine class asbestos chrysotile.

These straighter fibers make the amphibole asbestos more likely to be inhaled while also causing more carcinogenic effects in a shorter period of time.

Crocidolite Asbestos Properties

A high soda content along with traces of iron and magnesium cause crocidolite to appear blue in many of its natural and processed forms.

However, it can also appear yellow or dark gray depending on its mining source and its processing.

Crocidolite has a high-temperature resistance and an extremely high resistance to acids. The material is also highly brittle and friable.

Because crocidolite is naturally formed in bundles of long, sharp fibers, it is more readily inhaled and causes more rapid health consequences than any other asbestos form.

Crocidolite Asbestos Uses

Crocidolite was originally preferred alongside chrysotile for industrial use in Europe, Australia, and Africa. It became common in pipe insulation, rope lagging, and thermal insulation, especially in industrial facilities.

The first crocidolite sources were discovered in Africa before the discovery of other mines in Australia and Bolivia.

Exposure to the mineral quickly revealed its deadly effects, later progressing into cancers that wiped out entire mining communities.

Aware of this danger, US manufacturers rarely used crocidolite, with less than four percent of all asbestos in the U.S. containing crocidolite.

Common Products Made with Crocidolite Asbestos:

  • Spray on insulation
  • Pipe insulation
  • Yarn and rope lagging

If you or someone in your family has been exposed to crocidolite or other asbestos types and have been diagnosed with cancer, contact our legal team immediately.

You will obtain immediate assistance and a free, confidential case evaluation. Connect with our team of the nation’s best mesothelioma lawyers, who will use their knowledge and resources to quickly identify all potentially liable parties and help you pursue maximum possible compensation for your losses.

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